Get all your data protection matters handled here!

Get all your data protection matters handled here!

The ‘one stop shop’ mechanism is one of the most heralded and yet most controversial features of the General Data Protection Regulation which draft is currently being negotiated within the Council of the European Union.

According to the most recent proposal of the Italian Presidency of the Council of the European Union, where data protection compliance of businesses operating across several EU Member States’ is in question or where individuals in different EU Member States are affected by a personal data processing operation, it would allow businesses to only deal with the Data Protection Authority (DPA) of the country where they are established.

Cases of pure national relevance, where the specific processing is solely carried out in a single Member State or only involves data subjects in that single Member State would not be covered by the model. In such circumstances, the local DPA would investigate and decide on its own without having to engage with other DPAs.

These are, however, deemed to be the exemption as the mechanism aims for a better cooperation among DPAs of the different EU Member States concerned by a specific matter.

Therefore, in cross-border cases, the competence of the DPA of the EU Member State of the main establishment does not lead to the exclusion of the intervention of all the other supervisory authorities concerned by the matter. In fact, while the supervisory authority of the Member State where the company is established will take the lead of the process which will ensue, the other authorities would be able to follow, cooperate and intervene in all the phases of the decision-making process.

In this context, if no consensus is reached among the several authorities involved, the European Data Protection Body (hereafter EDPB) will decide on the binding measures to be implemented by the controller or processor concerned in all of their establishments set up in the EU. Similarly, the EDPB will have legally binding powers in case of failure to reach an agreement over which authority should take the lead.

Multi-jurisdictional operating businesses operating in the EU, which handle vast amounts of personal data, would highly benefit from this ‘one stop shop’ concept, which would enable to reduce the number of regulators investigating the same cases. Indeed, as things stand presently, a company with operations in more than one EU Member State has to deal with 28 different data protection laws and regulators, which unavoidably leads to a lack of harmonization and legal uncertainty.

The Article 29 Working Party has already manifested its support for a ‘one stop shop’ mechanism under the proposed EU General Data Protection Regulation.

However, in the past, Member States have manifested numerous reservations regarding this mechanism. Among the main concerns expressed were the following: businesses would be able to ‘forum shop’ in order to ensure that their preferred DPA leads the process; a DPA would not be able to take enforcement action in another jurisdiction; individuals’ rights to an effective remedy under EU laws would not be appropriately recognised; authorities without the lead position would not be able to influence processes related to data protection breaches involving nationals of their Member States.

As the way the ‘one stop shop‘ mechanism would be implemented in practice is one of the main causes of the hindrance for the Member States to reach an agreement on the wording of a new EU General Data Protection Regulation, let’s hope that the solution proposed by the Italian Presidency of the Council of the European Union does get closer to a suitable accommodation of the various concerns expressed by Member States.